Thursday, June 2, 2011

A Scene From The Answer Man

I watched the movie The Answer Man tonight.

It is a Romantic Comedy about "A reclusive author of spiritual books, who is pursued for advice by a single mother and a man fresh out of rehab."

It was a touching and funny movie, but loaded with the F bomb- which is probably the only reason it was rated R. (I never understand why they have to use bad language in movies- the story is just as good if they would clean it up. So- I don't recommend it if you are convicted by watching movies with bad language- especially the F Bomb.)

Anyway, there was a school scene that I wanted to share. The last part is so true!

I'll set up the scene for you: The main character (Arlen) was asked by his (girl)friend to pick up her son (Alex) at school and to tell them he was her brother if there was any question as to who he was..and he was NOT to talk to anyone about anything. It just so happened there was a conference scheduled for that afternoon to talk about Alex being placed in the gifted program at this private school- so Arlen stepped in for the Mom. Here's how the conference went:

(Teacher)
Well, Alexander... First let me say what a joy he is to have in class. He's a very creative child and he makes friends with everyone. If one of the other students is hurt or upset, Alexander's always the first one to show them comfort. He's quite empathetic.

(Arlen- pretending to be Alex's Uncle Zebulon)
And empathetic is good.
 
(Teacher)
- Great.
- But in some of the other areas...
 
(Arlen)
Empathy, reading, friendship... what else is there?
 
(Teacher)
Well, math. He's far behind the other students. He still struggles with arithmetic
while the other students have moved on to multiplication.
 
(Arlen)
Well, you're the teacher. Aren't you supposed to be able to find a way to teach it to him?
 
(Teacher)
I have 26 students. I can't devote all of my time to one student. And Alexander still needs to learn our very first lesson. And he's also... oh, how do I say this? Well, immature.
 
(Arlen)
He's seven.
 
(Teacher)
Yes, but he still jokes with his seatmates during a lesson and sometimes while we're trying to have peaceful time. The other students still have to learn all the same lessons, and Alexander often makes this difficult. I think if Alexander's really going to thrive...
 
(Arlen)
Let me stop you right there. I'm gonna tell you a couple of things. All kids develop in different ways at different times and in different directions. Now I am confident that Alex at some point will be able to tell time and make change, which, let's face it, just about covers it.
 
(Teacher)
I don't think you're hearing me.
 
(Arlen)
What I am hearing is that Alex is not a good candidate to be a robot in your clone army.
 
(Teacher)
Zebulon...
 
(Arlen)
We're gonna work on the math, okay? In the meantime, why don't you try not making him feel like being who he is is the problem?
 
That's what happened to you and me, remember?

2 comments:

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